3D printing

With increased medical precision, speed of service and reduced cost, 3D printing presents a unique opportunity to transform traditional healthcare and its delivery. We give key insights on an array of topics that includes 3D printing of implants and prosthetics, anatomical modeling for surgical planning and the advances of bioprinting of tissue, vessels and organs.

3D printing in times of COVID-19

3D printing in times of COVID-19

As COVID-19 quickly spread worldwide at the beginning of the year, an urgent need has risen worldwide for specialized health and medical products such as the nasal swabs to collect viral samples or PPE.

Silk improves bioink for artificial organs

Silk improves bioink for artificial organs

Researchers mechanically reprocess silk into a biologically compatible component of bioinks that improves the structural fidelity of 3D-printed hydrogels containing cells for use in drug development and regrowing lost or damaged body

3D printed transparent fibers can sense breath

3D printed transparent fibers can sense breath

Researchers used 3D printing techniques to make electronic fibres, each 100 times thinner than a human hair, creating sensors beyond the capabilities of conventional film-based devices.

The heat is on for building 3D artificial organ tissues

The heat is on for building 3D artificial organ tissues

Radiator-like fluid systems adjust the genetic wiring inside human liver cells in preliminary work toward artificial organ-tissue engineering.

Bioprinting tiny, functional organs

Bioprinting tiny, functional organs

Researchers have developed an approach to print tiny tissues that look and function almost like their full-sized counterpart.

3D printed ultra-low-cost hearing aid

3D printed ultra-low-cost hearing aid

Using a device that could be built with a dollar's worth of open-source parts and a 3D-printed case, researchers want to help the hundreds of millions of older people worldwide who can't afford existing hearing aids to address their age-related hearing loss.

“Stretching rack” for cells

“Stretching rack” for cells

An ingenious device, only a few micrometers in size, enables to study the reaction of individual biological cells to mechanical stress.

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