With this method, patients with Parkinsons disease can be monitored at home and...
With this method, patients with Parkinson's disease can be monitored at home and elsewhere and provide clinicians with vital information to effectively manage and treat their patients with this disorder.
Source: Florida Atlantic University

AI system tracks tremors in Parkinson’s patients

Researchers have developed machine learning algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, can continuously track tremor severity in Parkinson's patients.

To effectively manage and treat tremors in PD patients, there is an urgent need for an approach that can continuously measure tremors accurately without the need for patients to perform specific tasks as they go about their daily activities. Researchers are teaching machines to accomplish this job. They have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, can continuously monitor patients and estimate total Parkinsonian tremor as they perform a variety of free body movements in their natural environments.

Results of the study indicate that this new approach holds great potential for providing a full spectrum of patients’ tremors throughout the course of the day. “A single, clinical examination in a doctor’s office often fails to capture a patient’s complete continuum of tremors in his or her routine daily life,” said Behnaz Ghoraani, Ph.D., senior author, an assistant professor in Florida Atlantic University’s Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. “Wearable sensors, combined with machine learning algorithms, can be used at home or elsewhere to estimate a patient’s severity rating of tremors based on the way that it manifests itself in movement patterns.”

The majority of existing approaches used today are task-dependent, requiring patients to perform standardized tasks like those used in rating scales. Furthermore, these approaches only provide moderate to good performance because of limitations in underlying algorithms to characterize tremor patterns from patients’ free body movements.

Ghoraani and her collaborators from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Rochester Medical Center wanted to test the idea that machine learning algorithms could track and quantify resting tremor within daily living activities and separate rhythmic shaking from normal activities without the performance of any standardized tasks.

For the study, researchers investigated the application of two machine-learning algorithms: gradient tree boosting and LSTM-based deep learning. These methods automatically estimated tremor severity (resting and action) using data from two gyroscope sensors placed on PD patients’ most affected wrist and ankle. They collected data while patients performed a variety of activities such as walking, resting, eating and getting dressed.

Findings from the study showed that the gradient tree boosting method estimated the total tremor as well as the resting tremor sub-score with high accuracy, and in most cases, with the same results estimated using the UPDRS. This method also showed the decline in tremors after patients took their medication even in cases where results did not match total tremor sub-scores from the UPDRS assessments. The LSTM-based method, on the other hand, provided lower performance.

“It is especially interesting that the method we developed successfully detected hand and leg tremors using only one sensor on the wrist and ankle, respectively,” said Murtadha D. Hssayeni, co-author and a Ph.D. student in FAU’s Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

This new method provides the highest performance among the UPDRS task-dependent methods and all the task-independent tremor estimation methods reported in the literature to date. “This finding is important because our method is able to provide a better temporal resolution to estimate tremors to provide a measure of the full spectrum of tremor changes over time,” said Ghoraani.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related articles

Wearable sensors to track Parkinson's symptoms

Wearable sensors to track Parkinson's symptoms

Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

A smart port for the brain

A smart port for the brain

Researchers are creating a smart port to the brain that will use artificial intelligence to selectively stimulate tissue regrowth and seizure intervention.

Step closer to high-performing wearable

Step closer to high-performing wearable

The University of Surrey has unveiled a device with unique functionality that could signal the dawn of a new design philosophy for electronics, including next-generation wearables and eco-disposable sensors.

A smart orthosis for a stronger back

A smart orthosis for a stronger back

Researchers developed ErgoJack to relieve back strain and encourage workers to execute strenuous movements in a more ergonomic way

Wearables must demonstrate efficacy in respiratory care

Wearables must demonstrate efficacy in respiratory care

Wearables are becoming a trend in respiratory care and many products are being developed to monitor patients remotely. But how much can these tools really help clinicians?

Wearables can help assess of myoclonic jerks

Wearables can help assess of myoclonic jerks

A study shows that wearable sensor technology can be used to reliably assess the occurrence of myoclonic jerks in patients with epilepsy also in the home environment.

Smart biomarkers to empower drug development

Smart biomarkers to empower drug development

Researchers aim to speed up developing drugs against brain diseases through cutting-edge technology. They are generating an innovative technology platform based on high-density microelectrode arrays and 3D networks of human neurons.

Brain-computer interface turns mental handwriting into text

Brain-computer interface turns mental handwriting into text

Scientists have used an implanted sensor to record the brain signals associated with handwriting, and used those signals to create text on a computer in real time.

Decentralized patient monitoring: Sensors quickly detect changes in vital signs

Decentralized patient monitoring: Sensors quickly detect changes in vital signs

The Fraunhofer Institutes project M³Infekt aims to develop a multi-modal, modular and mobile system of sensors for monitoring infectious diseases.

Popular articles

Subscribe to Newsletter