Researchers are developing a novel approach that combines neuroelectronics and...
Researchers are developing a novel approach that combines neuroelectronics and artificial intelligence.
Source: DZNE / Amin Lab

Smart biomarkers to empower drug development

Researchers from the DZNE’s Dresden aim to speed up developing drugs against brain diseases through cutting-edge technology. To this end, they are generating an innovative technology platform, termed “i3D-Markers”, based on high-density microelectrode arrays and 3D networks of human neurons.

Compounds to be tested will be dripped onto this setup, and artificial intelligence will be used to determine the reaction of the neurons. With this platform, the DZNE scientists intend to optimize the selection of robust drug candidates for clinical trials and help avoid dead-ends in the development pipeline.

Drug development is costly and marked by setbacks. “In recent years, most new drugs against brain diseases have failed in human studies. One reason for this is the inefficient in vitro assays for neurological diseases – especially in the early phase of drug development before clinical trials begin”, said Dr. Caghan Kizil, a neuroscientist who focuses on generating experimental models and novel understandings of Alzheimer’s disease. 

His colleague, Dr. Hayder Amin, remarked: “The existing methodology is a fundamental shortfall. The human brain is tremendously complex and cannot be modeled adequately by the current methodologies used in the laboratory. They are too reductionist to reveal the true effect of a drug on neuronal networks. In particular, two-dimensional cell cultures and conventional data acquisition methods do not capture the complicated electrophysiological and cellular properties of the brain.” Amin, who has vast expertise in multiscale experimental neuroscience, neurotechnology, and developing computational tools to investigate neural dynamics, added: “This generates a critical need for tools that better support the development of new pharmaceuticals.”

A fusion of technologies

The researchers have innovative ideas to tackle this problem. “i3D-Markers”, their novel technology platform, could answer a critical question in drug development: “How would a particular candidate drug affect the human brain networks: good or bad?”. Experience shows that this question is difficult to answer before clinical trials in humans. “In fact, many drug candidates that show medical potential in the laboratory or animal studies fail in clinical trials due to unwanted effects on human brains,” Amin said. 

The DZNE scientists are optimistic that i3D-Markers can make a difference. “Our goal is to validate that our technology can predict, better than current methodologies, whether an experimental compound will have the intended effect on humans. Hopefully, this will help to accelerate the path to new medicines, avoid dead ends in drug development and reduce development costs,” Kizil said.

The concept of the researchers fuses neuroelectronics with an innovative cell culture method. “i3D-Markers utilizes neuronal cultures interfaced with a micro-chip. We grow neurons on high-density microelectrode-based chips to form a neuronal 3D configuration as in the brain. This setup enables us to track the electrical activity from thousands of neurons simultaneously with high spatiotemporal resolution,” Amin explained. “This large array of tiny little sensors gives us insights into the dynamics of this very complex human neuronal network. We will obtain high-content data in unprecedented detail and single-cell resolution.”

A drug to be tested will be dripped onto the neurons at a specified concentration. “Then you start recording electrophysiological data, which will be collected by our array of sensors,” Kizil said.

Synopsis of the technology of “3D-Markers” and its components.
Synopsis of the technology of “3D-Markers” and its components.
Source: DZNE / Amin Lab

Smart predictive algorithms

Although the network will comprise more than a hundred thousand neurons, this cell culture, including the micro-chip, would fit an area 10 times smaller than a 2-eurocent coin. However, the neuronal activity information will be complex since it is rendered by thousands of micro-contact sensors. Thus, for analysis, the scientists will use artificial intelligence methods. Such algorithms identify and extract patterns from complex multidimensional data. “By using artificial intelligence and special mathematical approaches, we want to develop so-called functional biomarkers based on the neuronal network activity. These biomarkers will tell us whether the network is doing well or not and if a given drug influences this condition, which will help us to identify promising compounds”, Amin said.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related articles

Smart system detects errors when medication is self-administered

Smart system detects errors when medication is self-administered

Many patients use their inhalers and insulin pens wrong. Researchers have developed a system to reduce those numbers for some types of medications.

Harnessing AI to discover new drugs

Harnessing AI to discover new drugs

Artificial intelligence can recognise the biological activity of natural products in a targeted manner.

An AI-inspired theory of dreaming

An AI-inspired theory of dreaming

The overfitted brain: Our dreams' weirdness might be why we have them, argues a researchers in new theory of dreaming.

AI makes great microscopes better than ever

AI makes great microscopes better than ever

Machine learning helps some of the best microscopes to see better, work faster, and process more data.

Brain-on-a-chip would need little training

Brain-on-a-chip would need little training

A neural network that mimics the biology of the brain can be loaded onto a microchip for faster and more efficient artificial intelligence.

Wearable sensors to track Parkinson's symptoms

Wearable sensors to track Parkinson's symptoms

Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

Algorithm designs soft robots that sense

Algorithm designs soft robots that sense

Deep learning technique optimizes the arrangement of sensors on a robot’s body to ensure efficient operation.

Customized “brains” for robots

Customized “brains” for robots

Researchers have developed an automated way to design customized hardware, or “brains,” that speeds up a robot’s operation.

A smart port for the brain

A smart port for the brain

Researchers are creating a smart port to the brain that will use artificial intelligence to selectively stimulate tissue regrowth and seizure intervention.

Popular articles

Subscribe to Newsletter