A microfluidic chip system as alternative to animal experiments

Since mid-2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT has been developing an analysis platform as an alternative to animal experiments in drug development as partner in the BMBF-funded project "VISION", coordinated by Saarland University.

Photo
Microfluidic chip system for the cultivation of different cell models under physiologically relevant conditions.
Source: Fraunhofer IBMT, Bernd Müller.

Animals as model organisms have so far often been essential for pharmaceutical research - they often provide important information on the efficacy of drugs or the safety of chemicals to humans. The protection of animals is opposed to the need to provide safe and appropriate medicines for humans. In Germany and at the EU level there are strict legal restrictions on animal experiments. Suitable alternative methods should help to reduce and avoid animal experiments. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research supports the development of alternative methods by funding around 600 scientific projects since 1980 with a total funding volume of more than 190 million euros.

These days, scientists are researching on so-called microphysiological systems that simulate and interlink various organ systems of the human body, such as the liver, lung, kidney or nerve cells.

In this context, the BMBF project "VISION", launched in June 2019, aims to reduce animal experiments by developing a special analysis platform. It consists of the combination of a microfluidic organ culture system (in vitro) and bioinformatic (in silico) analyses of disease mechanisms. "VISION" develops and validates the in vitro/in silico analysis platform especially for toxicological inhalation studies, which could reduce animal testing in regulatory, application-oriented and basic research. At the same time, the microfluidic chip system creates new possibilities for mimicking various cell and tissue types in vitro in order to generate biological, pharmacological and toxicological data for in silico method development under physiologically relevant conditions. Biomedical engineering as well as biological-medical and pharmaceutical science from Saarland are closely cooperating to develop the "VISION" analysis platform based on a combination of (a) an in vitro lung-liver model, (b) bioinformatic analysis methodology and (c) the integration of clinical data, which enables detailed biological, pharmacological and toxicological analysis.

Within the framework of the joint project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT has taken on the task of developing and optimizing sensitive in vitro systems (lung model and liver model) for mimicking the lung barrier and the metabolism process in the liver and their integration into microfluidic systems to determine specific effects of pollutants or therapeutic agents after pulmonary uptake into the organism. Using these methods, meaningful in vitro analyses are performed to generate well-founded data sets as a basis for the development of the in silico model.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related articles

COVID-19 speeds up microfluidics development

COVID-19 speeds up microfluidics development

With soaring demand for point-of-care testing (POCT), microfluidics has been a pivotal resource as COVID-19 swept across the world.

Using tumor-on-a-chip to find cancer drugs

Using tumor-on-a-chip to find cancer drugs

Researchers have developed a 'tumor-on-a-chip' that can better mimic the environment inside the body, paving the way for improved screening of potential cancer fighting drugs.

Teaching an organ-on-a-chip to see

Teaching an organ-on-a-chip to see

Organ-on-a-chip technology has the potential to revolutionize drug development. Researchers have succeeded in putting various types of tissue onto chips.

Organ-on-a-chip: Device simplifies study of blood cells

Organ-on-a-chip: Device simplifies study of blood cells

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body.

Magnetic spray transforms objects into millirobots

Magnetic spray transforms objects into millirobots

Scientists have developed an easy way to make millirobots by coating objects with a glue-like magnetic spray.

virtual.COMPAMED receives international resonance

virtual.COMPAMED receives international resonance

COMPAMED 2020 took place entirely online due to the pandemic - but still won over their audiences due to their high degree of international resonance in this format too.

An artificial cell on a chip

An artificial cell on a chip

Researchers have developed a precisely controllable system for mimicking biochemical reaction cascades in cells.

Scientists improve metallic glasses

Scientists improve metallic glasses

Researchers have managed to develop a unique method to process bulk metallic glasses.

“Stretching rack” for cells

“Stretching rack” for cells

An ingenious device, only a few micrometers in size, enables to study the reaction of individual biological cells to mechanical stress.

Popular articles