Can video games improve the health of elderly with schizophrenia?

Using video games, Heather Leutwyler, associate professor of Physiological Nursing at the UC San Francisco School of Nursing, aims to lower the toll these disorders have on older people with schizophrenia and improve their functioning by getting them up and moving.

Photo
Heather Leutwyler aims to lower the toll co-occurring disorders like heart disease or diabetes have on older people with schizophrenia and improve their functioning by getting them up and moving.

Though the use of video games to promote exercise might seem counterintuitive, over the past six years, Leutwyler has secured funding from several sources to design and test an intervention that uses the Kinect system for Xbox to provide an engaging and entertaining group exercise program for older adults with schizophrenia in a variety of treatment settings (e.g., inpatient, transitional residential). She and her co-investigators chose the video game-based program because the self-paced nature of the games offers a safe and easy way for a sedentary population to get started with exercise.

The researchers began with a once-per-week pilot program to gauge interest and test feasibility, and found that both residents and staff liked it, which led them to expand it to a 10-week program that met for one-hour sessions three times per week. Each session focused on a different mobility skill: strength and flexibility through tai chi; aerobic fitness with games like soccer or skiing; and balance and coordination with a game called “20,000 Leaks,” which requires participants to use their hands, feet and other parts of the body to “plug” leaks in a virtual tank. “The participants said it was a really nice thing to do – to come play video games at the end of a long day of going to psychotherapy,” says Leutwyler. “We weren’t expecting it because [people with schizophrenia] tend to be more socially isolated. Instead they were really supportive of each other, but they also were competitive – they wanted to see their scores go up.”

Early research successes

Mid- and end-point measures of the program found that it was achieving the hoped-for aims. There were clinically and statistically significant improvements in walking speed, and investigators saw improvement in negative mental health symptoms like social withdrawal and lack of motivation. “In focus groups, [participants] have been telling us they feel more engaged in their health and that it’s easier to get around and do daily activities,” says Leutwyler. “They even tell us they notice others in the group having an easier time doing chores around the house.”

The pilot project was designed to show the efficacy of the program, and Leutwyler and her co-investigators have submitted a journal article outlining the findings and discussing how similar programs could be implemented in similar settings. She hopes it will pave the way for more funding to further explore the program’s possibilities and to expand it to more facilities.

Leutwyler’s interest in the health of people with serious mental illness began when, as a new family nurse practitioner, she was providing primary care to people living in a locked mental health facility. “I noticed that all my patients’ physical health was very poor, but that the older adults had the most health issues and the most difficulty trying to be healthier,” she says. “Prescribing meds and talking with them one-on-one wasn’t going to make the impact I wanted.”

That’s part of why, as she continues to pursue her work, Leutwyler left the game systems at one of the pilot sites, where residents have continued to play the games. She doesn’t think simply putting an Xbox in a mental health facility is a panacea for improving the physical health of residents, but offering a simple, facilitated program might be a cost-effective start.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related articles

Gamification: Intervention app may improve mental health

Gamification: Intervention app may improve mental health

A new randomized control trial has found that turning mobile mental health intervention into a smartphone game can potentially improve well-being.

Mindfulness video game changes areas of the brain

Mindfulness video game changes areas of the brain

Researchers designed a video game to improve mindfulness in middle schoolers and found that when young people played the game, they showed changes in areas of their brains that underlie attention.

Brain training app decoder improves users’ concentration

Brain training app decoder improves users’ concentration

A new 'brain training' game improves users' concentration. Scientists say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world.

Augmented reality helps tackle arachnophobia

Augmented reality helps tackle arachnophobia

Researchers have developed an augmented reality app for smartphones in order to help people reduce their fear of spiders.

Chatbots could train our mental condition

Chatbots could train our mental condition

Technology will play an increasingly social and even emotional role in our lives. Virtual conversations lead to more self-compassion.

Virtual reality used in creative arts therapies

Virtual reality used in creative arts therapies

Virtual reality is an emerging as a tool in creative arts therapies. Now, researchers examined the differences in prefrontal cortex activation between two distinct drawing tasks in VR.

The next generation of brain-computer interfaces

The next generation of brain-computer interfaces

Future brain-computer interface systems employ a network of independent, wireless microscale neural sensors to record and stimulate brain activity.

Minecraft advances artificial intelligence

Minecraft advances artificial intelligence

Researchers at the Pennsylvania State University plan to test next-generation artificial intelligence skills withinthe video game Minecraft.

Research programme to bioprint ear and noses launched

Research programme to bioprint ear and noses launched

The Scar Free Foundation has launched a research programme that aims to revolutionise surgeons’ ability to reconstruct nose and ear cartilage in patients affected by facial difference.

Popular articles

Subscribe to Newsletter