How 5 upper body exoskeletons support natural movements
Source: Hocoma

How 5 upper body exoskeletons support natural movements

Exoskeletons are wearable devices that, as a further development of conventional orthosis, are designed to aid or even restore certain movements for the user. We present five upper body exoskeletons that might help restore natural hand or limb movements.

Report: Mareike Scholze

MyoPro Orthosis

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Source: Myomo Inc

Originally developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with Harvard Medical School, the MyoPro is a powered arm and hand orthosis designed to help restore function to the wearer's paralyzed or weakened upper extremities. The device reads the faint nerve signals (myoelectric signals) from the surface of the skin (fully non-invasive, with no implants) before activating small motors to move the limb as the user intends (no electrical stimulation).

The user is completely controlling their own hand, wrist, elbow, and arm; the robotic arm brace amplifies weak muscle signals to help move the upper limb. For that reason, it has been called "power steering for your arm."

The MyoPro Orthesis can be used with medical conditions like stroke arm paralysis, brachial plexus injury or Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It is designed to help individuals perform actions and daily activities that they otherwise could not do or only with difficulties. It may also facilitate rehabilitation, including muscle re-education and increasing range of motion.

https://myomo.com/

Hand of Hope

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The Hand of Hope (HOH) therapy device is used for neuromuscular rehabilitation of the hand and forearm. It is intended to help patients regain hand mobility through motor relearning after a stroke or a brain injury. 

The hand brace is worn on the dorsal side of the impaired hand with 2 surface sensors attached to the extensor and flexor muscles of the arm to detect the surface electromyographic signals (sEMG) for active participation during exercise. The sEMG signals are processed so the patient can visualize the active movement of the muscle where sEMG electrodes are positioned. No electrical current is applied to the patient.

http://www.rehab-robotics.com.hk

ReGo

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The ReoGo is a clinically proven motorized robotic arm. The system combines personalized training programs and interactive games to facilitate both 2D and 3D movements for enhancement of motor and functional recovery of the upper extremities. The solution is specifically designed to meet the rehabilitation needs of a wide spectrum of patients suffering from stroke or other brain-related injuries, and orthopedic conditions at different stages of recovery.

ReoGo’s patient-specific functionality allows patients to relearn upper limb normal movement through neuromuscular reeducation and brain retraining. Through intensive and consistent repetitive motion and advanced biofeedback, the ReoGo improves range of motion, speed, muscle strength, and cognitive functions to promote patient independence and quality of life.

https://motorika.com/reogo/

Wearable Cyborg

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Source: Cyberdine

HAL [Hybrid Assistive Limb] is claimed to be the world‘s first Wearable Cyborg, by which a wearer‘s physical functions can be improved, supported, enhanced and regenerated.

When a person tries to move, the brain signals the muscle to command the movement. At that time, a very faint signal that reflects the wearer's intention to move appears on the skin's surface. Using its sensors attached to the skin's surface, HAL detects these so-called "bio-electrical signals" to perform the desired movements with the wearer's voluntary commands.

Various product adjustments are available to medical professionals to help the wearer achieve their intended movements more easily or work on correcting abnormal signals through catered therapeutic exercises.

https://www.cyberdyne.jp/english/products/SingleJoint.html

AMADEO

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Source: Tyromotion

Amadeo is a robotics and sensor-based rehabilitation device for use with either hand. It allows assistive and interactive therapies for individual fingers and thumbs movements. Patients can be set-up quickly and easily and the arm supports can be changed quickly. Adults and children can use it in all rehabilitation phases, and patients with spasticity can use it or those with high tone. Four assessment programs (strength, ROM, tone, spasticity) are available.

https://tyromotion.com/en/products/amadeo/

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