Single-use biosensors ease remote monitoring

BioIntelliSense, Inc., announced the U.S. commercial launch of its medical grade Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) platform and FDA 510(k) clearance of the BioSticker on-body sensor for scalable remote care. "We are at the inception of a remarkable new era in healthcare that will employ medical grade sensor technologies to effortlessly capture remote patient data and generate personalized clinical intelligence," said James Mault, MD, FACS, CEO of BioIntelliSense.

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The BioSticker on-body sensor for scalable remote care.
Source: BioIntelliSense, Inc.

The BioSticker is an advanced on-body sensor that allows for effortless continuous monitoring of vital signs and actionable insights, delivered to clinicians from patients in the home setting, thereby creating unique opportunities for early detection of potentially avoidable complications. Through the platform's data sets and analytics, highly-efficient care is now possible at a fraction of the cost of traditional remote patient monitoring.

BioIntelliSense has established a strategic collaboration with UCHealth and its CARE Innovation Center to demonstrate the value and clinical applications of the BioSticker device and medical-grade services. This alliance is committed to developing and validating new models of data-driven care that are patient-centered and built for scale. "The future of healthcare will see the lines blurred between the hospital, clinic and home," said Dr. Richard Zane, UCHealth Chief Innovation Officer and Chair of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "The use of the BioSticker device for continuous health monitoring enables us to monitor a patient in their home and recognize when a patient may have an exacerbation of illness even before they manifest symptoms. This may reduce hospitalizations, emergency department visits and shorten hospital stays, creating cost efficiencies for health systems."

"We are proud and excited to be working with the innovative teams at UCHealth and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus," Dr. Mault said. "It is a remarkable collaboration and clinical proving ground for our continuous monitoring and predictive data services platform. UCHealth has made it possible for BioIntelliSense to rapidly accelerate the development of our technology, as well as optimize its clinical validation."

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