Garmin partakes in wearable study

Wearable technology developer Garmin is a collaborating with the University of Kansas Medical Center to better understand how wearables can assist in the detection and management of significant medical conditions. Their initial research will focus on sleep apnea and atrial fibrillation.

Photo
Garmin and KU Medical Center, a world-class academic medical research facility, have begun work on multiple research projects combining the high-quality sensor data from Garmin devices and the health care expertise of KU Medical Center researchers.
Source: Garmin Health

“Garmin Health is excited to work with a nationally-recognized institution like KU Medical Center that is on the forefront of digital health research,” said Scott Burgett, Director of Garmin Health Engineering. “As patients assume increased responsibility for their own health care, Garmin is committed to the development of wearables that can lead to the prevention or detection of serious health conditions. With long battery life, high water rating, and high-quality sensor data, we can provide meaningful features that will help reduce health care costs and provide useful functionality for everyday life.”

For patients with known conditions, continual monitoring can offer health care professionals valuable insight and assist in a well-informed course of treatment. KU Medical Center research provides clinically based data that can aid in the development of algorithms capable of identifying conditions like sleep apnea and atrial fibrillation.

Sleep apnea, a clinically under-detected and costly disorder to study, may affect over 18 million Americans. Garmin Health has worked with Suzanne Stevens, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology, and Catherine Siengsukon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, at KU Medical Center to study how a wearable equipped with optical sensors could be used to detect sleep apnea and provide a lower cost alternative to an overnight sleep center evaluation.

“Wearables have already increased the public’s awareness of activity levels while awake,” said Dr. Stevens. “This research helps us better understand how wearables can do the same while asleep, helping to detect sleep apnea, which left untreated can affect mood, memory, trigger heart arrhythmias, heart attacks, and even strokes.”

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular and often rapid heart rhythm that can increase the risk of stroke by 500% and can cause heart failure. It is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of people in the United States alone with rates expected to continually increase. Like sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation has been cumbersome and costly to detect. Unfortunately, in 20% of patients, atrial fibrillation is not identified until they have a stroke.

Garmin Health is working with Madhu Reddy, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine at KU Medical Center and Division Director, Heart Rhythm Services in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at The University of Kansas Health System, to study how Garmin wearables could detect atrial fibrillation. “Wearable technology capable of early detection and monitoring of heart rhythm disorders will be a revolutionary boon to cardiac care,” said Dr. Reddy.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Related articles

Optimal use of activity trackers fails due to outdated computer skills

Optimal use of activity trackers fails due to outdated computer skills

Activity trackers are rising in popularity. Yet a new study demonstrates that many struggle to optimally use these devices. The cause? Outdated digital literacy skills.

Why focus on wearables and home-based hospitals?

Why focus on wearables and home-based hospitals?

Accessible and affordable healthcare is one of the topics of Healthcare Automation and Digitalization Congress.

Verifying and validating the clinical usefulness of wearables

Verifying and validating the clinical usefulness of wearables

Researchers have developed a framework that will help data scientists and other researchers use better digital health tools for clinical purposes.

Smart wristband alerts about dangerous health conditions

Smart wristband alerts about dangerous health conditions

Researchers are developing a smart wrist-worn device for monitoring of atrial fibrillation – a condition, which if left untreated can lead to serious health complications and even death.

Sensor warns of impending COVID-19 cytokine storm

Sensor warns of impending COVID-19 cytokine storm

Scientists report preliminary results on a sweat sensor that acts as an early warning system for an impending cytokine storm, which could help doctors more effectively treat patients.

Sticker detects cystic fibrosis in newborn's sweat

Sticker detects cystic fibrosis in newborn's sweat

Researchers have developed a novel skin-mounted sticker that absorbs sweat and then changes color to provide an accurate, easy-to-read diagnosis of cystic fibrosis within minutes.

Harvesting energy from radio waves to power wearables

Harvesting energy from radio waves to power wearables

Researchers have developed a way to harvest energy from radio waves to power wearable devices.

Hearables: How to make headphones intelligent

Hearables: How to make headphones intelligent

Engineers have invented a cheap and easy way by transforming headphones into sensors that can be plugged into smartphones to monitor users heart rates.

From the wrist into the ear – the potential of hearables

From the wrist into the ear – the potential of hearables

A subset of wearables are the so-called hearables – in-ear devices that are well suited for long-term monitoring as they are non-invasive, inconspicuous and easy to fasten.

Popular articles

Subscribe to Newsletter